OldWestNewWest.com: History & Travel Magazine

Wednesday
Feb 21st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home
yellowstone
The oldest hotel in Yellowstone National Park, Lake Yellowstone Hotel, has received a bottom-up facelift that would make any grand dame of 122 years proud.

The project, costing in excess of $10 million, included new lobby décor, major structural enhancements, the addition of an elevator, new business center and 43 renovated rooms, including four newly created suites in the west wing of the hotel.
Read more...  
Yellowstone National Park has updated its fishing regulations for the 2013 season which began on May 25. The changes have been made to better align the regulations with the park's Native Fish Conservation Plan, rangers said.

To help protect native fish species, the limit on non-native fish caught in the park's Native Trout Conservation Area has been eliminated. This includes all park waters except the Madison and Firehole rivers, the Gibbon River below Gibbon Falls, and Lewis and Shoshone lakes.
Read more...  
Yellowstone National Park's 2012-13 winter season for the public officially opened today, Dec. 15, 2012.

Visitors are now able to travel to the park's interior roads on commercially guided snowmobiles or snowcoaches from the North, West and South Entrances. Travel through the park's East Entrance over Sylvan Pass is scheduled to begin Dec. 22.
Read more...  
Roads to most of Yellowstone National Park's popular tourist destinations close for the season at 8 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, 2012 so park staff members can begin preparing the roads for limited, commercially guided snowmobile and snowcoach travel for the winter season, which begins Dec. 15.

Most visitor services in Yellowstone National Park have already ended for the season.
Read more...  
Join Yellowstone Association Institute naturalist MacNeil Lyons at the REI in Bozeman on March 10, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. for a free multi-media presentation on Springtime Wonders and Recreation in Yellowstone .

Learn how to take advantage of Yellowstone National Park's "shoulder season" through insider tips on which locations are the best for viewing wildlife, what park roads are open, as well as advice on how to travel safely and lightly on the land. Discover what impact your recreational opportunities might have on the resources during this quiet time in the park.
Read more...  
Yellowstone National Park rangers have identified the woman who accidentally fell to her death on June 7, 2012 as 18-year old Maria "Masha" Sergeyevna Rumyantseva of Kaliningrad, Russia.

Rumyantseva was a Yellowstone concession employee on her first day in the park when the accident happened. She was hiking the canyon's North Rim Trail with three other acquaintances when she ventured out off trail onto a loose rock promontory. The rock quickly gave way underneath her, according to reports.
Read more...  
Join Yellowstone Association Institute naturalist MacNeil Lyons at the REI in Bozeman on March 10, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. for a free multi-media presentation on Springtime Wonders and Recreation in Yellowstone.

Learn how to take advantage of Yellowstone National Park's "shoulder season" through insider tips on which locations are the best for viewing wildlife, what park roads are open, as well as advice on how to travel safely and lightly on the land. Discover what impact your recreational opportunities might have on the resources during this quiet time in the park.
Read more...  
Rangers have recovered the body of a young woman who accidentally fell to her death June 7, 2012 near Inspiration Point in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

The 18-year-old woman, a Yellowstone concession employee on her first day in the park, was hiking the canyon's North Rim Trail with three other acquaintances when she ventured out off trail onto a loose rock promontory, which quickly gave way underneath her.
Read more...  
The nonprofit Yellowstone Association Institute (YAI) has announced its 2011 summer lineup of Field Seminars, and the 75 programs, including 21 new offerings, range from wildlife behavior and hiking to history, geology, and the wolves of Yellowstone.

"We have many visitors who are fascinated by specific Yellowstone topics, and we developed many of these new programs to address those interests," said Jeff Brown, director of education for YAI. "Our summer courses cover a wide range of topics and help to achieve our goal of generating a stronger appreciation of Yellowstone. They are also some the best values in the region."
Read more...  

Bears are emerging from hibernation in the Greater Yellowstone Area, and rangers are advising hikers, skiers and snowshoers to stay in groups of three of more, to make noise on the trail and carry bear spray.

On March 12, 2012 Yellowstone National Park employees observed a grizzly bear in the north central portion of the park. Fresh tracks were also spotted during the same time frame in the Old Faithful area.

Read more...  
With the park experiencing significant snowfall throughout its boundaries at the end of 2011 and into the New Year, Yellowstone National Park has shifted fully to oversnow travel for visitors and staff.

Rubber- and steel-tracked guided snowcoaches and snowmobiles now are allowed to travel on all interior park roads, with the exception of the road between Mammoth Hot Springs and Norris Junction, which is restricted to rubber-tracked guided snowcoaches only until snow conditions improve.
Read more...  
Yellowstone National Park is moving into its winter mode, and that means roads to most of the park's popular tourist destinations, including Old Faithful ,will close for the season at 8 a.m. Monday, Nov. 7, 2011.

Most visitor services in Yellowstone National Park have already ended for the season.
Read more...  
A new plan designed to relieve traffic congestion and improve safety at Yellowstone National Park's historic North Entrance has been approved.

A Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) allowing construction to begin on the Gardiner, Montana, North Entrance and associated Park Street infrastructure was signed by the National Park Service Intermountain Region Director Oct. 13, 2011.
Read more...  
Following the capture and killing of a grizzly linked to two Yellowstone fatal maulings of hikers, a review of bear and wildlife management as well as visitor regulations will soon get underway by park rangers and staff.

"We are already discussing our approach to bear management and wildlife management and visitor education," Al Nash, park spokesperson, told OldWestNewWest.com Travel & History Magazine.
Read more...  

UPDATE: Park rangers captured and euthanized a grizzly bear sow, after linking her to the scene of two fatal maulings of hikers. Her cubs were captured and will spend the rest of their lives in captivity. For our complete report on the capture and killing of the grizzly, click here.

ORIGINAL STORY:
Yellowstone Park rangers and wildlife officials have captured and tested three male grizzly bears in the area where a Michigan hiker was mauled to death, but an official said the attacker may never be known.

Park spokesperson Al Nash on Sept. 7, 2011 said the three large males were trapped some time since the start of the Labor Day weekend. DNA samples were taken, the bears collared with tracking devices, then released back into the wild.

Read more...  

UPDATE: Yellowstone park rangers and wildlife officials reportedly captured a 420-pound male grizzly near where hiker John Wallace was killed, but officials are waiting for DNA results to determine if the bear is the one responsible for killing the hiker. The bear was collared with a tracking device and released, according to reports.

Original story: Despite daily reconnaissance flights over the area where hiker John Wallace was mauled to death, as of Sept. 2 the grizzly responsible for killing the Michigan hiker remained at large in Yellowstone National Park and at risk to other hikers.

Spotting aircraft flying over Mary Mountain Trail where 59-year-old Wallace was enjoying some of his favorite park areas before his untimely death have resulted in very few bear sightings, park rangers said.

Read more...  
After recording no deaths from a bear attack in the park since 1986, Yellowstone National Park now has experienced its second hiker killed this year by a grizzly.

Park rangers on Aug. 29, 2011 identified John Wallace, 59, from Chassell, Mich. as the victim of a grizzly attack while he was hiking along the Mary Mountain Trail.
Read more...  

While the man's wife watched helplessly as the mauling took place, a hiker at Yellowstone National Park is dead following a surprise encounter Wednesday with a grizzly bear.

The incident occurred July 6, 2011, on the Wapiti Lake trail, which is located east of the Grand Loop Road south of Canyon Village.

Read more...  
You wouldn't know it from the deep snowpack covering the park, but some of Yellowstone's bears may be thinking that winter 2011 is drawing to a close.

On Tuesday, March 1, park employees observed grizzly bear tracks on Mary Mountain, which is roughly near the center of the lower loop of the park's Grand Loop Road.
Read more...  
Editor's Note: A Federal judge on Sept. 15 blocked plans to allow snowmobiles into Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks this winter. See our story elsewhere in this issue. Following is our original story about the plans for the 2008-2009 winter season. We will keep you up to date on any changes.


New rules are being proposed by the National Park Service for allowing fewer snowmobiles and snowcoaches in both Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks starting in the winter of 2008-2009, and mandating quieter and more energy efficient machines.
Read more...  
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »
Powered by Tags for Joomla
Banner