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Home Places to Visit Museums Paul Dyck Collection: Plains Indian Artifacts Preview Now Open

Paul Dyck Collection: Plains Indian Artifacts Preview Now Open

13 Pieces from a Remarkable Collection of More Than 2,000 Artifacts Go On display at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming

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Thirteen remarkable artifacts from the Paul Dyck Buffalo Culture Collection are now on exhibit at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, providing visitors with a preview of an historic and important Plains Indian collection.

The exhibit comprises two cases, one with men’s artifacts and one with women’s artifacts, and is displayed in the Plains Indian Museum. The more than 2,000 artifacts in the collection include moccasins, cuffs decorated with porcupine quillwork, a toy cradle, a cradle, a shield cover, dresses, and shirts, a horse mask, and a bear claw necklace.


“We selected these particular pieces because they were in good condition and represented a balance of Plains Indian tribes,” said Emma I. Hansen, Plains Indian Museum Curator. “Since this is a preview, we wanted to offer visitors variety with just a few artifacts, and this is a good way to accomplish that.”


The collection itself—started by Dyck’s father in 1886—includes clothing, eagle feather bonnets, bear claw necklaces, buffalo hide tipis and tipi furnishings, shields, cradles, peace medals, moccasins, and much more. It dates from the late 1700s to pre-1890s, a period identified by Paul Dyck as the “Buffalo Culture” era.

 

 


The historical center has been interested in the Dyck collection for more than 30 years, according to a spokesperson. In early 2006, the collection—what Dyck’s family calls “systematically collected, rather than haphazardly acquired”—arrived at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.


By September 2007, the transaction was completed through a generous gift purchase arrangement with John Dyck and the Dyck family. The collection was officially acquisitioned through additional gifts from the Nielson family and the estate of Margaret S. “Peg” Coe.


To date, the Dyck Collection has not been available to, nor viewed by, the general public.


“Consisting primarily of many early to mid-nineteenth century Plains Indian cultural materials, the Paul Dyck Collection is recognized by scholars as one of the largest and most significant private collections of Native American art and artifacts,” Hansen remarked.


“Bringing the Paul Dyck Collection to the Plains Indian Museum will ensure that these exceptional objects will be preserved and the collection will remain intact for current and future generations of interested Native Americans and others with interest in Plains Indian arts and cultures,” she added.


Paul Dyck, a descendent of Flemish painter Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599 – 1641), was born in Chicago in 1917. The family lived in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, near Blackfeet reserves. Later, Dyck was sent to Europe to apprentice with an uncle who was a successful artist, and by age 15, he was on his own, studying at the Munich Academy.


Dyck served in World War II and then settled at an Arizona ranch where he became an author, illustrator, lecturer, and painter of western subjects. Over time, Dyck developed many friendships with Blackfeet, Crow, Cheyenne, Lakota, and other Plains Native people.


Objects in the Dyck collection can be viewed on the historical center’s Web site at
www.bbhc.org/pim/dyckCollection_general.cfm


The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is open daily 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Devoted to Western cultural and natural history, the BBHC is comprised of the Buffalo Bill Museum, Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Plains Indian Museum, Cody Firearms Museum, Draper Museum of Natural History, and McCracken Research Library.

 

 

 

“This collection helps tell the full story of the Plains Indians,” Hansen explained. “The artifacts come from several different tribes, and because of the dates of the materials, they fill in many gaps in our collection as we tell the story of the Plains people.”


The historical center has been interested in the Dyck collection for more than 30 years, according to a spokesperson. In early 2006, the collection—what Dyck’s family calls “systematically collected, rather than haphazardly acquired”—arrived at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.


By September 2007, the transaction was completed through a generous gift purchase arrangement with John Dyck and the Dyck family. The collection was officially acquisitioned through additional gifts from the Nielson family and the estate of Margaret S. “Peg” Coe.


To date, the Dyck Collection has not been available to, nor viewed by, the general public.


“Consisting primarily of many early to mid-nineteenth century Plains Indian cultural materials, the Paul Dyck Collection is recognized by scholars as one of the largest and most significant private collections of Native American art and artifacts,” Hansen remarked.


“Bringing the Paul Dyck Collection to the Plains Indian Museum will ensure that these exceptional objects will be preserved and the collection will remain intact for current and future generations of interested Native Americans and others with interest in Plains Indian arts and cultures,” she added.


Paul Dyck, a descendent of Flemish painter Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599 – 1641), was born in Chicago in 1917. The family lived in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, near Blackfeet reserves. Later, Dyck was sent to Europe to apprentice with an uncle who was a successful artist, and by age 15, he was on his own, studying at the Munich Academy.


Dyck served in World War II and then settled at an Arizona ranch where he became an author, illustrator, lecturer, and painter of western subjects. Over time, Dyck developed many friendships with Blackfeet, Crow, Cheyenne, Lakota, and other Plains Native people.


Objects in the Dyck collection can be viewed on the historical center’s Web site at
www.bbhc.org/pim/dyckCollection_general.cfm


The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is open daily 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Devoted to Western cultural and natural history, the BBHC is comprised of the Buffalo Bill Museum, Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Plains Indian Museum, Cody Firearms Museum, Draper Museum of Natural History, and McCracken Research Library.


For general information, call 307.587.4771 or visit www.bbhc.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This collection helps tell the full story of the Plains Indians,” Hansen explained. “The artifacts come from several different tribes, and because of the dates of the materials, they fill in many gaps in our collection as we tell the story of the Plains people.”

 

 

 

 

“This collection helps tell the full story of the Plains Indians,” Hansen explained. “The artifacts come from several different tribes, and because of the dates of the materials, they fill in many gaps in our collection as we tell the story of the Plains people.”


The historical center has been interested in the Dyck collection for more than 30 years, according to a spokesperson. In early 2006, the collection—what Dyck’s family calls “systematically collected, rather than haphazardly acquired”—arrived at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.


By September 2007, the transaction was completed through a generous gift purchase arrangement with John Dyck and the Dyck family. The collection was officially acquisitioned through additional gifts from the Nielson family and the estate of Margaret S. “Peg” Coe.


To date, the Dyck Collection has not been available to, nor viewed by, the general public.


“Consisting primarily of many early to mid-nineteenth century Plains Indian cultural materials, the Paul Dyck Collection is recognized by scholars as one of the largest and most significant private collections of Native American art and artifacts,” Hansen remarked.


“Bringing the Paul Dyck Collection to the Plains Indian Museum will ensure that these exceptional objects will be preserved and the collection will remain intact for current and future generations of interested Native Americans and others with interest in Plains Indian arts and cultures,” she added.


Paul Dyck, a descendent of Flemish painter Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599 – 1641), was born in Chicago in 1917. The family lived in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, near Blackfeet reserves. Later, Dyck was sent to Europe to apprentice with an uncle who was a successful artist, and by age 15, he was on his own, studying at the Munich Academy.


Dyck served in World War II and then settled at an Arizona ranch where he became an author, illustrator, lecturer, and painter of western subjects. Over time, Dyck developed many friendships with Blackfeet, Crow, Cheyenne, Lakota, and other Plains Native people.


Objects in the Dyck collection can be viewed on the historical center’s Web site at
www.bbhc.org/pim/dyckCollection_general.cfm


The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is open daily 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Devoted to Western cultural and natural history, the BBHC is comprised of the Buffalo Bill Museum, Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Plains Indian Museum, Cody Firearms Museum, Draper Museum of Natural History, and McCracken Research Library.


For general information, call 307.587.4771 or visit www.bbhc.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This collection helps tell the full story of the Plains Indians,” Hansen explained. “The artifacts come from several different tribes, and because of the dates of the materials, they fill in many gaps in our collection as we tell the story of the Plains people.”


The historical center has been interested in the Dyck collection for more than 30 years, according to a spokesperson. In early 2006, the collection—what Dyck’s family calls “systematically collected, rather than haphazardly acquired”—arrived at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.


By September 2007, the transaction was completed through a generous gift purchase arrangement with John Dyck and the Dyck family. The collection was officially acquisitioned through additional gifts from the Nielson family and the estate of Margaret S. “Peg” Coe.


To date, the Dyck Collection has not been available to, nor viewed by, the general public.


“Consisting primarily of many early to mid-nineteenth century Plains Indian cultural materials, the Paul Dyck Collection is recognized by scholars as one of the largest and most significant private collections of Native American art and artifacts,” Hansen remarked.


“Bringing the Paul Dyck Collection to the Plains Indian Museum will ensure that these exceptional objects will be preserved and the collection will remain intact for current and future generations of interested Native Americans and others with interest in Plains Indian arts and cultures,” she added.


Paul Dyck, a descendent of Flemish painter Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599 – 1641), was born in Chicago in 1917. The family lived in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, near Blackfeet reserves. Later, Dyck was sent to Europe to apprentice with an uncle who was a successful artist, and by age 15, he was on his own, studying at the Munich Academy.


Dyck served in World War II and then settled at an Arizona ranch where he became an author, illustrator, lecturer, and painter of western subjects. Over time, Dyck developed many friendships with Blackfeet, Crow, Cheyenne, Lakota, and other Plains Native people.


Objects in the Dyck collection can be viewed on the historical center’s Web site at
www.bbhc.org/pim/dyckCollection_general.cfm


The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is open daily 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Devoted to Western cultural and natural history, the BBHC is comprised of the Buffalo Bill Museum, Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Plains Indian Museum, Cody Firearms Museum, Draper Museum of Natural History, and McCracken Research Library.


For general information, call 307.587.4771 or visit www.bbhc.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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